Introduction to VARK

Do you know how you learn?

VARK tells you something about yourself that you may or may not know. It can be used to understand your boss, your colleagues, your parents, your workmates, your partner, your customers, your teacher, your relatives, your clients and yourself. It is a short, simple inventory that has been well-received because its dimensions are intuitively understood and its applications are practical. It has helped people understand each other and assists them to learn more effectively in many situations.

VARK is free for use by individual teachers and students in colleges, high schools, and universities for student or faculty development.  It is not free for large numbers of students or teachers and fees are required for research use.  Please see the copyright page of this website and our home page for more information about legitimate use of VARK.

For business and other users (trainers, coaches and tutors…) please apply for your use.

Although we have known for centuries about the different modes, this inventory, initially developed in 1987 by Neil Fleming, Christchurch, New Zealand, was the first to systematically present a series of questions with helpsheets for students, teachers, employees, customers, suppliers and others to use in their own way.

Many inventories label people who then want to ask “So what?” VARK goes on to provide strategies that help people understand and move on from any label they might be given. Once you know about VARK, its power to explain things will be a revelation.

Video Interview

Dr. Alan Wright, is the University of Windsor’s first Vice-Provost, Teaching and Learning. He interviewed Neil Fleming, the designer of VARK, and by his permission the videos of that interview can be viewed here. The interview was designed to provide a broad understanding of the principles of VARK as applied to educational use.

What is VARK?

The origins of VARK

Describe the different learners VARK identifies

What is a multi-modal learner?

How can teachers and students use VARK?

Is VARK a learning style?

What is the link between VARK and communication?

How has VARK been accepted at the University of Windsor?